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Список групп и альбомов, с которыми работал Michael Wagener

Цитата:
MICHAEL WAGENER - Partial Discography

P = PRODUCED, R = RECORDED, M = MIXED, G = GOLD, P = PLATINUM

FRANNY AND THE FIREBALLS ROCK AND ROLL EULENSPIEGEL 1979 R M
DOKKEN BACK IN THE STREETS DEEJAY RECORDS 1979 P R M
ACCEPT BREAKER METRONOME 1980 R M
M?TLEY CR?E TOO FAST FOR LOVE LETH?R RECORDS 1981 M
BRESLAU VOLKSMUSIC EMI-GERMANY 1982 R M
PLASMATICS COUP D'ETAT EMI CAPITOL 1982 R M
ACCEPT RESTLESS AND WILD METRONOME 1982 P R M
ALEX PARCHE BAND ADRENALIN EMI-GERMANY 1983 P R M
GREAT WHITE OUT OF THE NIGHT AEGEAN RECORDS 1983 P R M
RAVEN ALL FOR ONE NEAT RECORDS 1983 P R M
DOKKEN BREAKING THE CHAINS ELEKTRA 1983 P P R M
ACCEPT BALLS TO THE WALL CBS 1984 G M
GREAT WHITE GREAT WHITE EMI-AMERICA 1984 P R M
X WILD THING ELEKTRA 1984 P R M
DOKKEN TOOTH 'N NAIL ELEKTRA 1984 P x2 M
RAVEN STAY HARD ATLANTIC 1984 P R M
X AIN'T LOVE GRAND ELEKTRA 1985 P R M
STRYPER SOLDIERS UNDER CMD ENIGMA 1985 P x2 P R M
DOKKEN UNDER LOCK AND KEY ELEKTRA 1985 P x3 P R M
ACCEPT RUSSIAN ROULETTE RCA CBS 1985 R M
POISON LOOK WHAT THE CAT DRAGGED IN ENIGMA CAPITOL 1986 P x3 M
METALLICA MASTER OF PUPPETS ELECTRA 1986 P x5 M
KANE ROBERTS KANE ROBERTS MCA 1986 P R M
ALICE COOPER CONSTRICTOR MCA 1986 G P R M
W.A.S.P. INSIDE THE ELECTRIC CIRCUS CAPITOL 1986 M
WHITE LION PRIDE ATLANTIC 1987 P x3 P R M
ALICE COOPER RAISE YOUR FIST N YELL MCA 1987 G P R M
BONFIRE FIREWORKS BMG 1987 G P R M
MEGADETH SO FAR, SO GOOD,SO WHAT CAPITOL 1987 P M
KROKUS HEART ATTACK MCA 1987 M
FLOTSAM & JETSAM NO PLACE FOR DISGRACE ELEKTRA 1988 M
OVERKILL UNDER THE INFLUENCE MEGAF. ATLANTIC 1988 M
SKID ROW SKID ROW ATLANTIC 1988 P x9 P R M
DOKKEN BEAST FROM THE EAST ELEKTRA 1988 P M
WHITE LION BIG GAME ATLANTIC 1989 P P R M
BONFIRE POINT BLANK BMG 1989 P R M
EXTREME PORNOGRAFFITTI A&M RECORDS 1990 P x4 P R M
JANET JACKSON BLACK CAT A&M RECORDS 1990 P x4 M
KANE ROBERTS SAINTS AND SINNERS GEFFEN RECORDS 1990 M
SAIGON KICK SAIGON KICK ATLANTIC 1990 P R M
QUEEN STONE COLD CRAZY HOLLYWOOD REC 1991 P M
SKID ROW SLAVE TO THE GRIND ATLANTIC 1991 P x4 P R M
M?TLEY CR?E DECADE OF DECADENCE ELEKTRA 1991 P x3 M
OZZY OSBOURNE NO MORE TEARS SONY CBS 1991 P x7 M
WARRANT DOG EAT DOG CBS SONY 1992 G P R M
OZZY OSBOURNE OZZMOSIS CBS SONY 1992
P x2

P R M
SKID ROW B-SIDES OURSELVES ATLANTIC 1992 M
OZZY OSBOURNE LIVE 'N LOUD SONY CBS 1992 P P R M
HELLOWEEN CAMELION EMI LONDON 1993 M
SASS JORDAN RATS MCA 1993 M
DOKKEN DISFUNCTIONAL JVC SONY 1994 P R M
TESTAMENT LOW ATLANTIC 1994 M
OUTRAGE LIVE UNTIL DEAF EAST WEST JAPAN 1995 P R M
TESTAMENT LIVE AT THE FILLMORE MEGAFORCE 1995 P M
ACCEPT PREDATOR BMG 1995 P R M
IMPELLITTERI SCREAMING SYMPHONY JVC-VICTOR 1995 M
OUTRAGE WHO WE ARE EAST WEST JAPAN 1996 P R M
PRUNELLA SCALES DRESSING UP THE IDIOT MUTINY 1997 M
TESTAMENT DEMONIC BURNT OFFERINGS 1997 M
WOLF HOFFMANN CLASSICAL JVC/JAPAN 1997 P R M
IMPELLITTERI EYE OF THE HURRICANE VICTOR JAPAN 1997 M
BADI ASSAD RHYTHMS OF THE WORLD POLYGRAM 1997 M
SKID ROW 40 SEASONS ATLANTIC 1998 P P R M
MURIEL ANDERSON THEME FOR TWO FRIENDS 1998 R M
SEBASTIAN BACH BRING 'EM BACH ALIVE! ATLANTIC/EAST WEST 1998 G P R M
O.C.D. RITUALISTIC 1998 M
ROLAND GRAPOW KALEIDOSCOPE JVC/JAPAN 1999 R M
HAIR OF THE DOG RISE SPITFIRE RECORDS 1999 P R M
PHOENIX DOWN UNDER A WILD SKY NOW AND THEN REC. 1999 M
RAVEN ONE FOR ALL PONY CANYON 1999 P R M
RANDY RHOADS TRIBUTE WARNER JAPAN 2000 G P R M
HAMMERFALL RENEGADE NUCLEAR BLAST 2000 P R M
GROOVENICS GROOVENICS SPITFIRE RECORDS 2000 P R M
BADI AND JEFF NOWHERE WATERSONGS MUSIC 2001 R M
DOKKEN LONG WAY HOME CMC/SANCUTARY 2002 R M
TITANIUM BLACK BLEED FOR YOU
(STEREO + 5.1surround) GREATDANE REC. 2002/3 P R M
OUTRAGE 20YEAR ANNIVERSARY 30 MINUTE RECORDS 2003 M
LOVE OVER GRAVITY END OF DAYS 2003 P R M
MercyMe LIVE DVD - 5.1 MIX INO records 2004 M
TODD GANOVSKI SOME TRUST IN CHARIOTS WORSHIPMUSIC 2004 M
BRUNOROCK INTERACTION SPV GERMANY 2004 R M
FRANS MANTRA I'M NOT YOU - 2004 P R M
KING'S X OGRETONES INSIDEOUT 2005 P R M
PHONODRIVE MUSIC - 2005 M
MIKE TRAMP LIVE MIKE TRAMP'S WHITE LION Frontiers Records 2005 P R M
HYDROGYN BOMBSHELL DARecords 2005 P R M
GOLDYLOCKS - - 2005 P R M
TRIGGERSOUL TRIGGERSOUL CHAVIS RECORDS 2005 M
SKID ROW REVOLUTIONS PER MINUTE SPV RECORDS 2006 P R M
THE BLACK MOLLYS IGNORANCE IS BLISS HIDEF RECORDS 2006 M
ROKTOPUSS DESPERATE HOUSEWIVES OF ROCK 2006 P R M
KING'S X XV INSIDE OUT RECORDS 2007 P R M
BRUNOROCK LIVE ON FIRE 2007 M
FATAL SMILE WORLD DOMINATION LOCOMOTIVE RECORDS 2007 M
UEBERGAS UEBERGAS STARKTON MUSIC 2008 M
THE RASMUS BLACK ROSES PLAYGROUND 2008 R M
CROOKED X CROOKED X EMI 2008 P R M
MARIJA ON THE INSIDE SHADOWSTALK 2009 P R M
ROAD TO EVENMIND DIAGNOSIS UNSOLVED INDEPENDENT 2009 M
DOKKEN GREATEST HITS DEADLINE MUSIC 2009 M
LORDI BABEEZ FOR BREAKFAST SONY FINLAND 2010 P R M
BABYJANE ARE YOU LISTENING INDEPENDENT 2010 M
ELDEBROCK ELDEBROCK INDPENDENT 2010 M


http://michaelwagener.com/html/discography.html

__________________________________________

Michael Wagener Interview :
http://areena.yle.fi/video/1281518

__________________________________________

Michael Wagener interview
From King's to Crooked:
The Michael Wagener Interview
Dr. Music talks with the legendary producer about ProTools, the music industry, and a couple of his X's

by Scott "Dr. Music" Itter

I sat on the CTA green monsters (Chicago’s less than elegant buses) day after day going to and from high school, tediously pushing rewind and fast forward on my cassette Walkman. Hard rock and metal is what usually found its way to the player, to make those days slightly more tolerable. One day it was Malice’s “In The Beginning,” and the next day it might have been Accept’s “Balls To The Wall,” but you could always bet your sweet patootie that the fillings in my teeth were rattling from the metallic sounds that were rocketing through my skull. All through those early 80’s I nurtured my love for melodic metal - Dokken, Raven, Great White, Stryper, Accept, W.A.S.P. - the list goes on and on. You could also say that I was a “student of the game,” reading every word of every liner note of every record I ever owned. One thing I saw consistently while exploring was the name Michael Wagener. His name, along with Double Trouble Productions, was branded upon so many of my favorite records. Since that time, I have continued to explore every liner note that crosses my path, and I can tell you that some things never change. I still see Michael Wagener’s name emblazoned upon a number of great records.

With hit records like Metallica’s “Master Of Puppets,” Ozzy Osbourne’s “No More Tears” and Skid Row’s self-titled debut album on his resume, Michael Wagener remains one of the most sought after producers in the world today. He has been involved with producing, recording, and/or mixing records that have sold in excess of 80 million copies, and that number continues to grow as fast as the price of gas.

Michael Wagener had become a different sort of “behind-the-scenes” hero to me while I was growing up. As teenagers, we all have musicians that we fancy and that demand our attention, but it's rare to find a producer that has the impact of that spotlighted "rock star." Michael Wagener is that producer. As a founding member of German metal band Accept, Wagener decided to leave the band early on to pursue a career on the recording side of the glass - and by doing so, he became a prominent figure in my musical life, as well as the lives of an entire generation of hard rockers. So, when I had the chance to talk to this hard rock crusader and maker of great metal, it was an enormous honor. On the morning of May 16th, 2008, from his home in Tennessee, Wagener was kind enough to talk to me on the phone before leaving for his studio. This is the conversation that followed......

Dr. Music: Hello Michael! Thanks so much for taking the time, it is truly an honor. Now tell me, what kind of producer is Michael Wagener? How involved in song structure will you get when producing a record? Will you suggest that the artist move a solo, or put in another verse, etc.?
Michael Wagener: “Absolutely. I think that’s part of producing. Arranging is part of producing. You know, you get in there, you hear the demos, and you contribute your ideas to it. Even sometimes there’s cases where I wrote the chorus and stuff like that. So yeah, I get very involved with every aspect of producing.”

Dr. Music: Do you have to “like” an artist to produce them?
Michael Wagener: “Absolutely.”

Dr. Music: Have you ever told an artist that you wouldn’t record something because you didn‘t like it?
Michael Wagener: “Absolutely. Foremost, I have to like the music. With five people in the band, sometimes there is somebody who is not quite along your wavelength, but the music is great and you still get along with them. But, the music is number one. If I like the music than I go and meet the people. If I think I can make a good record with them, than that‘s the second step. And I have to find out their way of what they want to do. If they want to do an over compressed, super loud record, than I’m probably the wrong guy. I like music. I like dynamics. I like melody. So, all that has to be part of it, otherwise I can‘t contribute to it.”

Dr. Music: What music did you listen to growing up in Germany?
Michael Wagener: “Well, everything rock pretty much. I grew up mostly with Deep Purple, Ten Years After, Hendrix, that kind of stuff."
Dr. Music: And you’ve stuck to that in your production, pretty much.
Michael Wagener: “Yeah, and I basically started the band Accept together with Udo [Dirkschneider], the singer; and that was exactly that kind of music.”
Dr. Music: Yes! Another of my favorites - “Restless & Wild.” One of my favorite moments in recording history is the beginning of “Fast As A Shark.”
Michael Wagener: “Yeah.” (laughs)



Dr. Music: How did that idea come up, with the record (in the beginning of the song)? Is that a traditional German record?
Michael Wagener: “Yeah, it’s actually a traditional song. The actual singer on that particular piece that we used is Dieter Dierks when he was a kid. Dieter produced the Scorpions and lots of other great bands. We found this tape at his studio, and then we sped it up a little bit and made it a little faster.”

Dr. Music: I just did a couple of interviews with longtime Heart guitarist Howard Leese, and he is preparing a solo album as we speak. He made it a point to mention that all of the guitar parts are played in only one pass. He has not pieced together any of them, and he was very proud of that. Now, you have worked with some really incredible players. Do you find that a lot of these great players end up doing their parts in one pass?
Michael Wagener: “Yes. The ticket is, bands like King’s X and Extreme, and also Accept, they would play everything in one go. The whole band would play at the same time. Okay, if there is a little mishap somewhere, you punch it in, no big deal; but they ‘swing’ together, and that to me makes a big difference. The more they play in one go the better it is. Unfortunately, that is becoming a lost art as I see it with the advent of DAW’s. People walk into the studio and expect you to fly in that part into all parts of the song, and to me that‘s just impossible. They could do that maybe in disco, or you can do it in electronic music. Yeah, that‘s made for that, but not in Rock.”

Dr. Music: How do you feel about the advent of ProTools and other disk-based software recording?
Michael Wagener: “Nothing wrong with it. I’m using Nuendo by Steinberg myself, just because I like the interface and I get along with it better. And, because people come to me because of me and not the gear that I’m using, I can pretty much use whatever I want. So I don’t have to adhere to what they call 'the industry standard' per say. I‘m still totally against a whole bunch of editing, and drum gridding, even auto tuning and sound replacing. I mean, music should be performed by the musician, not by a typist. We are selling emotions, there are no emotions in a grid.”

Dr. Music: Do you still record analog and if so, why?
Michael Wagener: “No. I haven’t been recording analog since the early 80’s. I’m not a big fan of analog tape. I do use a lot of analog outboard gear in the whole setup, but I got away from analog tape as soon as I could. That was, I think, in ‘81. If I remember it right, ‘Balls To The Wall’ [Accept] was digital already.”

Dr. Music: Are you producing the band Crooked X?
Michael Wagener: “Yes!”
Dr. Music: What is it like having a band that’s only 13 or 14 years old in the studio? Is it easier or more difficult?
Michael Wagener: “It’s……..both. It’s both - because they’re more open to everything, they’re not spoiled, but there’s still a little bit of experience for them to be learned in life. And, Rock and Roll is a pretty rough trade. So, in that case, it’s a little bit more involved. But I’ll tell you what, it’s a TON of fun. Those kids are so good, and they’re so determined with their music. It’s just wonderful. I think Crooked X is going to be one of the biggest bands of the 2000’s.”
Dr. Music: Are there ever any issues with parents interfering?
Michael Wagener: “No, the parents are great! The dad of the drummer sets up the drums and takes care of all that, and one of the other dads helps them with writing and arranging the stuff. They’re very much involved, in a very good way.”

Dr. Music: Are there any bands that you would refuse to work with because of a previous altercation?
Michael Wagener: “Well, I turned down the mix of Guns ‘N’ Roses’ ‘Appetite For Destruction.’ It was because there was a lot of drugs involved at the time. Financially it was a big mistake, but, well, you know, I still kept my integrity. There’s situations where if bands are addicted to drugs then it’s just a waste of time. You know, it doesn’t make sense. If somebody smokes a little bit or drinks a beer or something like that is a whole different story than somebody being addicted to heavy drugs. I just wouldn’t do it.”

Dr. Music: What is the worst part about the music industry?
Michael Wagener: “The worst part is that it’s all about money, and not about music anymore. It’s all about sales, you know, and gimmicks. A band like The Stones, or The Beatles, or probably even Hendrix would never make it today - so would Elvis. Those bands would not exist. They would never get signed. So, that’s my problem with it; the quality of what’s being put out there.”

Dr. Music: How involved in your work do the record labels get? Are the larger major labels easier or harder to work with than the smaller independent labels?
Michael Wagener: “It depends. It totally depends on the A&R guy. In the early 80’s, mid-80’s, they got very much involved. But, at that time, you would talk to an ex-bass player, ex-guitar player, ex-drummer as an A&R guy. Later on, in the 90’s, you would be talking to an accountant, or to a lawyer running the show and those people just shouldn’t get involved in musical decisions. I’ve had a lot of time to defend the band from the label, actually. Nowadays, it’s more and more a different situation. I mean, there’s only what, three major labels left. So, the independent labels are different because they still care about the music a little bit more.

Now, on another basis, lately I do a lot of records that are self-financed. The bands have a sponsor. Because of labels not wanting to spend money on an album anymore. We had it that a record would cost about half a million dollars. But, for that half a million dollars you got one record where at least 9 of the 10 songs were really good; they were worked out; the band was cared about in terms of what they wear on stage and the rest of their image, and it was a whole buildup, it was a whole process. And that has gone away. Now the labels went, ‘Oh wow, half a million for a record. Why don‘t I make 10 bands for that, and I don‘t end up with 10 songs, I end up with 100 songs and my odds are much better.’ And that‘s wrong thinking.

Because, for the little money, the band would go into some garage, and at that point everybody basically could record, technically, but not artistically. So, there was a lot of stuff thrown on the market that wasn‘t very good, and the kids go, ‘Okay, out of 10 songs there‘s one good one, and they want $18 for that.’ Then Napster came out, and the kids went, ‘You know what? I‘m just gonna download it.’ So it‘s that way around. It‘s not like kids started downloading and the sales went down because of that. It‘s because labels put out crap, to say it that way, and the kids voted with their wallet. Look at bands like Evanescence, they put out amazing stuff and they still sell 9 million copies. I think that stuff is downloaded as well.”

Dr. Music: Do you feel there are certain styles of music that stand to benefit more than others from the 5.1 surround format? For example: Would a band like AC/DC utilize the capabilities as much as a band like Dream Theater might?
Michael Wagener: “Yes, I think it would. I think everything should be in surround. There is a few problems with it: 1) Who’s going to listen to it? You know, people listen when they’re walking, when they’re running, on their headphones….. Convenience is what counts, so downloading an MP3 is very convenient. We don’t have 5.1 headphones. If I could, I would do everything in 5.1; and, to me, the most important thing is that it’s produced and recorded that way, not just remixed from a stereo mix. A stereo mix is meant to be a stereo mix. If you take Eric Clapton out of the band picture and separate his playing from the same speaker that the bass and the drums are coming off, it sounds odd. It’s meant to come at you in one complete picture, and if you separate that out it doesn’t feel the same. But if you would record it that way and track it that way and then decide, okay, we now have a little hole on the rear right and let’s put something there to fill up the picture, then it’s a whole different story.

I did a whole record in surround. It was Titanium Black. That was produced in surround and it‘s just awesome, you know. It‘s just a medium that‘s really hard to sell. And it‘s involved, so people don‘t buy it. It‘s not convenient.”

Dr. Music: Out of all the artists that you’ve come in contact with in the studio, who came to the studio best prepared?
Michael Wagener: “Um………..(long pause)……..I don’t even know. The thing is, I am doing pre-production. I‘m still ‘old school.’ So once I get the demo I suggest my changes, and we do that in pre-production. By the time pre-production is over, the band is pretty much ready to record. There are bands who record brilliantly without being super prepared, like King‘s X. They‘re brilliant musicians, and you can do changes on the spot. They don‘t have to practice the changes, they just play them, it‘s crazy!”


King's X

Dr. Music: Is there one particular record that you have been involved with that holds a special place in your heart more than any other?
Michael Wagener: “There’s actually a few. I always refer to the first Skid Row album as the album that sticks in my memory the most. And that is because it was just such a good time, and I think you can hear that attitude and all the fun on the record. But I have to say, 99.9% of the records that I’ve done were a lot of fun. And, that whole attitude and the feeling you have while you’re doing the record is what’s going to end up on the record.”


Skid Row's debut album

Dr. Music: Now, you’ve been involved with recording some of the most notorious and controversial artists of all time, not including Guns ‘N’ Roses! That would’ve been one right on the top of the bunch there!
Michael Wagener: (laughs) “….Or Soundgarden, which I turned down, too.”
Dr. Music: Did you turn down a production or a mix?
Michael Wagener: “The whole thing.”
Dr. Music: Which album?
Michael Wagener: “The first one. The label played me the demo and even though I thought the music was good, what I heard I thought, well, no that’s not up my alley. Whomever did it, I think Michael Beinhorn ended up doing it, did a brilliant job. But after turning that down, I thought it was time to get a manager.” (laughs)


Dr. Music: Like I say, you’ve gotten some pretty notorious and controversial artists. You’ve got to have some war stories. I’m going to name an artist, and you give me your thought on them:

W.A.S.P. --

Dr. Music: Blackie has been known to be very difficult about everything in his career; hard to deal with but very professional. What was your view?
Michael Wagener: “I didn’t think he was very hard to deal with. He was very professional, and he had a strong idea of where he wanted to go with everything. I think that‘s great. I think he‘s a great guy.”

Dave Mustaine (Megadeth) --

Dr. Music: I know you only mixed that record [“So Far, So Good, So What”], and you might not have had too much contact, but he’s another one that’s said to be very difficult to deal with.
Michael Wagener: “Not at this end. When I was mixing it, at the time, I think there was still drugs involved. I didn’t see those guys much, except for Jeff Young, who was the guitar player in the band at that point, who pretty much hung around the studio a lot. But they came in for like, honestly, 5 -10 minutes, listened to the mix, go ‘Yeah! That’s cool! See you later!’ And that’s all I saw of them.”

Alice Cooper --

Michael Wagener: “Oh, Alice is absolutely great. He is a very hard worker. He is very involved in what he does, and he‘s just a great guy. He’s very very smart. And funny! Alice has to be funny because his stuff is so dark.”
Dr. Music: I got a chance to see him on the “Raise Your Fist And Yell” tour. Just an incredible show, what a showman.
Michael Wagener: “See?! That’s what’s missing now. The kid’s go up there, they stand in one spot singing about how their mom’s hate them, and they look at their shoes while they’re doing it. Alice……THAT’S a show, and Crooked X…..THAT’S a show; they kick butt up there.”

Motley Crue --

Michael Wagener: “Well, Motley Crue is Motley Crue. You’ve seen Motley Crue, you’ve read the book, you’ve seen the videos - that’s the band. I knew Mick Mars from before. I had done some demos with him from his previous band, Vendetta, and when I came back to America he goes, ‘Dude, you gotta mix our record.’ So, I went in their and mixed the record, and when I walked in the first thing I see is Tommy Lee laying on the floor lighting his farts on fire. So, that’s how I met Motley Crue, and it went downhill from there.” (laughs)

Ozzy Osbourne --

Michael Wagener: “Well, Ozzy is a very close idea to Alice. He’s got an amazing sense of humor. He’s very smart and does exactly what he wants to do. Now that TV show doesn’t portray him right. He’s WAY smarter than that. He’s also WAY funny! When Ozzy starts telling stories, the session is over. And man, does he have some stories; it’s just unbelievable.”
Dr. Music: Now what about Sharon [Osbourne, Ozzy’s wife and manager]? We see Sharon very involved, very commanding. Have you had any altercation of any kind with Sharon?
Michael Wagener: “No, absolutely not. I only had great meetings with her. I have absolutely no problem with Sharon. I got paid on time. Everything was always correct and very professional.”

Wendy O. Williams (The Plasmatics) --

Michael Wagener: “Wendy was just amazing because she would sing in the control room, standing right next to me at the console. When she was singing, I could not hear the music anymore because her voice was so loud that the speakers were gone.”
Dr. Music: Now Wendy’s known for drugs, and problems, and I believe she committed suicide, am I right?
Michael Wagener: “Yeah, she did in the end. But at the time when we did that record [“Coup D‘Etat”], no, none of that. She was very healthy, exercising and all that.”

And finally, the last question…..

Dr. Music: Who haven’t you worked with that you would like to work with?
Michael Wagener (responding immediately): “AC/DC. This is my way favorite band. They‘re coming out with one record after the other that‘s absolutely great. And they‘re sticking to their style. They never changed or did anything. I love their music. ‘Back In Black‘ is my all-time favorite album.”

Wagener is currently working out of his own superstudio, located on a lush 10-acre parcel just outside of Nashville, which he affectionately calls WireWorld. Wagener has implemented a host of new features within WireWorld, including production workshops and something called Ears-4-Hire, which is a “house calls”-type of program that allows an artist to hire Michael Wagener himself for a personal session at the artist’s studio. He explained, “It’s specifically to your studio, to your setup. We might want to re-wire some stuff, we might want to re-do some stuff. It’s a personal thing for those people to learn to work with their equipment.” Wagener also elaborated about the in-studio 9-day workshops he personally conducts, “We record and mix one song from top to bottom. It’s more for the technical side of it. I call it the propellor head stuff.” He continued, “You won‘t believe how much people can learn doing those sessions. Even people that have been in the business for 25 years sometimes; they walk out of there and you can tell, literally, that their heads are smoking.” Well, I know it’s not the first time Michael Wagener has started a head smoking, and I’m sure it won’t be the last.

**************************************************

I would like to send extra special thanks to Michael for taking so much time to talk with me first thing in the morning. His knowledge and wisdom can only be eclipsed by his kindness and consideration. It was a true honor, Michael.

To find out more about Michael Wagener (including a partial discography) or WireWorld Studios you can visit: http://www.michaelwagener.com

©l


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Добавлено спустя 4 часа 21 минуту 49 секунд:








Добавлено спустя 31 минуту 49 секунд:

Interview with Michael Wagener http://www.chandlerlimited.com/chandler ... 503_01.php

CL: Some Background. How did you get your start?

MW: It evolved basically in three phases. The first was when I got my first guitar and started a band with singer Udo Dirkschneider. That band turned into ACCEPT later.

The second phase started with me working in a German company called STRAMP. We built guitaramps, speaker cabs and later studio and live consoles. And the last phase started with my first own studio called Tennessee Studio in Hamburg Germany. All three phases have a significance to me and all contributed to what I’m doing today. The band phase gave me great input from the musical side, during my work at STRAMP I got my degree in electronics and by owning a studio I could combine it all together.

CL: Tell us about your studio.

MW: My studio is called WireWorld and is just outside of Nashville Tennessee. I built it 8 years ago and I am currently running Version 2.0. Version 1.0 was a basic recording/mixing setup with a couple of Yamaha 02Rs and Tascam DA-88s. Version 2.0 is fully 5.1 surround equipped and now I am using two Sony DMX R-100 consoles and a Euphonix R-1 as the centerpieces. There is tons of great outboard gear and a nice list of microphones. WireWorld is finally where I want it, technically and sound wise. It took 8 years and a lot of fine tuning and a lot of help of great gear (like all the Chandler stuff) to make it a pro environment. You can find some more detailed info here: http://michaelwagener.com/html/ww.html

CL: You have a long history of successful projects. Can you brag a bit and give us a nice list of them and how many records you've sold?

MW: There are too many to list here, but you can check out my discography right here: http://michaelwagener.com/html/dtp.html. I think all together I’m close to 60 million units sold with my name on it.

CL: Your most memorable/fun project?

MW: They are all memorable (for different reasons), and most of them were a lot of fun, but the ones that will always stick out in my memory are the first SkidRow album, the first Raven album and Ozzy’s No More Tears album. All of them were very intense albums to make, but all of them were intense in very different ways.

CL: What are your favorite Chandler pieces and why?

MW: Now that’s a hard question, because all my Chandler gear is my favorite. On the top of my list would be the TG-1. It makes it onto every record, sometimes twice. At first I mainly used it for drum-sub compression, there is nothing better for that in my book. Lately I have been using it on Lead vocals, overheads, guitars. You can really squeeze the heck out of the vocals and they just become bigger and more in your face. That also means now I need a second one :-}

Next on the list are the TG-2 and the TG channel. The TG-2 is my absolute favorite mic pre for electric guitars. Combined with a Royer ribbon mic it is Harmonics City. The TG-Channel is seeing a lot of use on snare. It has a certain depth to it, kind of 3D, without loosing the crack on the top. If you turn the output down and crank the input on the Channel your snare will come alive and it sounds like the drummer is using telephone poles instead of sticks. The TG-Channel is also amazing on electric guitars.

LTD-2 is being used on every bass track that enters or leaves the studio and the LTD-1 is my “universal” pre, good for everything, but especially on bass, percussion and vocals. But I’m sure the biggest champion will be the Mini TG module frame filled up with a bunch of goodies, can’t wait.

CL: What are your favorite non-Chandler pieces?

MW: CraneSong HEDD, CraneSong STC-8, GreatRiver MP-2NV and EQ-2NV, SPL Transient Designer and the GrooveTubes VIPRE.

_________________
There is Old Accept, New Accept (shit)


 

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А ещё Michael Wagener умеет на рояле и на байке. Журнал CRASH 1986 01:

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Michael Wagener

Interview with Will Kahn for Burl Audio, 2012

You’ve been making large label records for many years now. You were born in Germany, could you talk about how you started in music and recording and how you came to the US?

Well when I was about 12 I bought my first guitar. I grew up with Udo Dirkschneider, we went to school together, and we are still best friends. We formed a band together, which later became Accept. When I turned 18, I was drafted to the army, and it makes practicing pretty hard when you are stationed 350 miles from home. So I ended up putting the guitar down and decided to move to the other side of the Studio window.

http://www.burlaudio.com/featured-artis ... el-wagener

_________________
A Single Tear in The River Of Life
Amamos La Vida


 

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February 8, 2012 by John Parks
Producer Michael Wagener (Skid Row, Crue,Dokken) talks shop with LRI
Michael Wagener Double Trouble Strudios

We have interviewed several of the bands he’s recorded and therefore were especially happy to hear from producer Michael Wagener recently. Michael is world-famous for creating the sound of so many bands that have defined rock over the last three decades and you probably remember reading many an album crediting his company Double Trouble Productions since he’s been involved in albums that total over 90 MILLION sales. He still continues to record amazing music both with newer bands like Hydrogyn and classic favorites like Skid Row. We called Michael for a nice little conversation while he had a moment to step away from his fantastic state of the art studio, WIREWORLD in Nashville and found out quite a bit about his part in some of the best albums to ever blare out of your car stereo. Read on…..

Legendary Rock Interviews: You go way back with the ACCEPT guys not only producing but having been the band’s original guitarist until you were drafted by the Army when you were 18 . You were schoolmates of theirs and I was just wondering what it was like growing up with Udo back in Germany?

Michael Wagener: Oh, it was a lot of fun actually! Udo and I have known each other since we were like 6 or 7 years old and it was as you can imagine a lot of fun the two of us had just being kids and getting wild and having a good time. Eventually, that’s how we ended up getting the band together back in the late sixties called “Band X” which later became ACCEPT.

LRI: The band definitely has carved its place in music history and is really one of those bands that had a unique power to it. Did you sense that the band’s music was tapped into something that was a little louder, heavier or stronger than other things going on?

MW: Not really heavier exactly but definitely the sense that they had their own thing going on, their own sound. Judas Priest was out there but ACCEPT sort of had their own thing in addition to having great songs and great musicians. I think from the beginning Udo’s voice was the main point. Wolf is a great guitar player, there is no DOUBT of that but I think if you really think about that band or any band for that matter, the identifying mark is always the singer.

LRI: How did you end up leaving Germany to move to the United States?

MW: I met Don Dokken over at my studio in Hamburg, Germany. We met and really hit it off right away and he invited me over so when I came over here with him I just decided fairly quickly that this was the place to be and a few years later I finally made the move permanently.

LRI: Did you initially get settled into the scene that was happening out in L.A.?

MW: I initially slept on Don’s couch (laughs). I finally ended up renting my own place but it started right there for sure. I was there in L.A. for twelve years.

LRI: I have talked with Don before, he was one of my first interviews and even back then he didn’t mince words when talking or taking stabs at George Lynch and likewise George about Don. What on earth was it like to be a part of those sessions where the two of them were making this great music but CLEARLY not getting along personally?

MW: Well you just had to work accordingly you know. It was sometimes very difficult because there were egos involved and egos are definitely important and a big part of stage presence but they should not be a factor in the studio environment or recording work. It made it much more difficult to work but I do think also that it also contributed to the end result and the quality of performances in the final results of those records though. Those feelings of tension and strife in the studio can be used to an advantage because it does end up translating to the final product, the records you hold in your hand. I don’t think it was a case of conscious competitiveness or anything it’s more under the surface, the way you are singing or the way you are playing as a result of that tension in the air. It wasn’t necessarily the case of Don cutting a vocal and going “I’m gonna show him” as much as it was a normal thing we all feel, if you are pissed off and working the tendency is to imprint that anger on the world around you.

LRI: You produced one of my favorite ACCEPT albums, BREAKER, and one of my favorite songs, SON OF A BITCH. Was it even more easy than imaginable to work with the guys based on the fact that you already had that longstanding relationship?

MW: Yeah, absolutely. We were just friends and we had a lot of fun making that record and that song in particular. The guys are also fantastic musicians so it is pretty straightforward whenever you can start with a great song and have great players to track it. I always think it’s really important for any band I work with to have fun in the studio and that was certainly fun but those guys are also very hard workers.

LRI: You worked with ALICE COOPER on two of his records as well as two of his guitarist KANE ROBERTS solo albums. Kane had very strong feelings about you and your work when we talked to him. Did you enjoy that era?

MW: Without a doubt. Kane is a brilliant, brilliant person. We are still good friends to this day and in addition to being very, very, smart he is of course an amazing guitar player and singer. He really brought a LOT to those Alice albums and of all the people I knew from L.A. he is one of the three people who I still talk to on a very regular basis. We became really close friends both inside and outside the music business. Kane is just an amazing and outstanding individual and one of the most genuine people I have had the pleasure of knowing. He’s really well-rounded and not only does great music but works with movies and games and is very, very talented and smart at computer graphics and art. When we were doing his first album he would come over to my house because I had a computer back then and it was like one of the first Apple computers and Kane was like “How do you turn it on?”. He is such a fast study that not soon after he was designing games and graphics and all that and I was just amazed (laughs).

LRI: Was it more of a challenge to try to BREAK a new artist like Kane or try to RE-ESTABLISH an artist like Alice Cooper?

MW: Hmmm. Well, you always try to do your best, always in any situation you try to do what you feel is right whether it is a new artist or an established legend. I think what some people don’t understand is that there are SO many variable and lights that have to turn green in order to make a record successful. The A&R has to be right, the promotion has to be right, the tour has to be right and on my end the production HAS to be right. It depends on all of those things and more, sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t. I think, speaking of Kane for example, those two solo albums Kane did NEVER got the attention or the appreciation that they really deserve. I truly feel that way and I think they are awesome albums.

LRI: Well, I agree with that especially the second album but I also think that those two Alice Cooper albums are criminally underrated.

MW: Yeah, yeah you are probably right and I think that was just the time, the moment wasn’t exactly right. Like I said, for some reason, sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t and a lot of times it really doesn’t have anything to do with how good the songs are because there are definitely some great songs on CONSTRICTOR and RAISE YOUR FIST AND YELL.

LRI: Having said all that, you have been a part of several bands’ BIGGEST albums including SKID ROW and WHITE LION. You worked with EXTREME on their biggest album PORNOGRAFFITTI. Their first album generated a decent buzz but nothing like what happened on the second album, did that surprise you at all?

MW: No. There are some times when you are working in the studio that you just have THAT feeling and you know, you are certain, that the project is going to do well, the strange thing is that I had those feelings working with EXTREME but also had those same feelings working with Kane so that goes back to how hard it is to gauge. I remember working on that album with EXTREME and knowing how good it sounded and how strong it felt to me while we were recording it and you just hope that if you are having that experience then it will translate to the person on the street. If you are getting goosebumps in the studio creating it there is a good chance the public will feel the same way provided they get the chance to hear it.

LRI: That album was such a strange crossover for that band. I remember reading about how they sold many, many albums to housewives and the like who put it on and found out that “More than Words” was surrounded by countless crazy guitar heavy hard rock songs. There was a whole audience of people exposed to that band other than the people who were Nuno fanatics like myself.

MW: Yes, but it’s ALWAYS been my experience that ballads have that ability. They are always potentially the biggest songs of a band’s career. Look at the Scorpions, look at Warrant, Motley Crue even. That is typically the case and “More Than Words” was a great, great ballad. That song being huge was exactly what I expected when the record company decided to run with it for a single and video. That’s just how it goes.

LRI: I would really like to interview the guys from King’s X but just haven’t for whatever reason. I saw them live back when they were just starting to make a dent and you produced them as well. I think that they are one of the most powerful bands and talented bands around but for whatever reason it seems like mainstream success just wasn’t in the cards although they did very well overseas. Did you enjoy being a part of their creative process in session?

MW: They are really artistic and amazing guys, absolutely amazing Ty, Dug, and Jerry. What comes out of that trio is like mind-boggling to tell the truth, I completely agree with you and your assessment. They were producing and engineering their own records for the pair of records they did before I got involved and they were more than happy to have someone there to handle the production and engineering end of things so that they could totally concentrate on their art. I think you can tell that the band played with a little more liberated feeling on the work we did, they weren’t concerning themselves with anything other than just creating and playing. That band was playing amazing, let me tell you, it was a lot of fun just watching them play.

LRI: You have done so much work and have such a resume does it bother you when people tell you that they love your work on the original Leathur Records version of TOO FAST FOR LOVE by Motley Crue?

MW: No, not at all. That would never bother me, absolutely not, I think it’s a great, great album.

LRI: Well, the reason I ask is because I told Tommy it was my favorite album and asked him to sign it and he said to me “Dude, all I hear when I listen to that is how many fucking mistakes I made on there.” It was a long time ago and it IS a pretty raw album.

MW: Yeah but they were a very young band and sometimes the things that stand out to listeners are the things that make artists cringe. Sometimes the mistakes are what are really good and real about an album. Tommy is an exceptional, extraordinary drummer and is very hard on his own performances as well. I think that album is really cool. I knew Mick Mars from well before that. We had worked on some things when he was still in his band Whitehorse, well before Motley Crue he had been playing in these other bands and I knew Mick and had worked with him on some demos and stuff. We stayed in touch and I ran into him one time when I was on vacation actually and he says to me “Hey, you gotta work on my album Michael. I’m in this band now called Motley Crue and we recorded our record and it’s finished but it has to be mixed” and I was there for the mixing which was all done on a Soundcraft console and it was a lot of fun to work on. The guys would come in to the studio in the evenings and listen to the mix of each individual song and be like “Yeah, that’s cool, let’s move on”. Mick was around the process a little bit more than the others at that time but it wasn’t difficult to deal with any of them, they were friends and they were CRAZY as hell, that much is true. We had a really good time and they knew how to have a good time which I thought was really cool. I’m really glad and proud to have been a part of that album, I am really happy to have been there at that time for them.

LRI: The video “DON’T BLAME ME” sort of documents the making of the “NO MORE TEARS” album from Ozzy that you mixed. It looked like the production was laborious and kind of time-consuming. Was the mix of that album considerably easy and do you think the people that attack Ozzy’s intelligence or creativity are full of shit?

MW: Absolutely on both counts. The album had already been recorded for the THIRD time by the time I was involved so I just got the tapes and did a test mix. They did a good job on the production both times but the mix could have been better which is when the label came to me and asked if I thought I could do a test mix. Everybody liked the test mix so I remixed the whole album. The process was similar to the MOTLEY process where Ozzy would come in around 6 or so in the evening and listen to each mix of each song and either say he liked it or talk about what he’d like to change and that was it. That album was very easy, Ozzy was fantastic to deal with and never , ever was there a problem on our end working with those guys, even again on the OZZMOSIS album because he had such an amazing band and he is such a serious worker. It was easy to get a good sound. The late Randy Castillo, Zakk Wylde, Mike Inez, where would you find a band better than that to work with? A lot of people have some pretty strong opinions about Ozzy that are pretty unfounded and I think a lot of it goes back to that Osbournes show where some of the situations and edits would make him look stupid. He is a very good worker and a smart guy who knows exactly what he wants and takes his craft very seriously, he was fantastic to work with in the studio and is a great performer. It is tremendous what he has done and that he is still around after all these years and I think people have underestimated his musical intelligence at times. He is very smart and was very much a part of the band sound and the direction of every project I have ever worked with him on.

LRI: Did you see something in your time working with Poison on their debut mix that would indicate the massive success they would achieve?

MW: Well, they were fun. They were obviously a “party” band and that is sometimes hit and miss but in their case I think it was so evident and part of their personality as a band from the beginning that it was a major hit. I think that changed as time went on but in the beginning you would have to admit they are one of the best examples of a good time “party” band and people respond to that when it’s real. The thing with that band is that they really did an amazing job of putting that over live, they were always one big party in concert and people just felt like they were a part of it all.

LRI: You recorded the self-titled debut of SKID ROW which is now considered a classic. That album was recorded up around our neck of the woods in Wisconsin and still sounds fantastic. What was that band like back in those days?

MW: It was pretty wild I mean SKID ROW were a young band and Sebastian in particular I think was 18 when we were up there recording. We did a few weeks of pre-production in a studio in New Jersey just fleshing out the material before heading up to Lake Geneva. We went from probably about twenty songs down to the twelve that finally got recorded. You could see the potential in the band and the potential in those songs and they had amazing management with Doc McGhee and so all of those lights were already on green and then you just had to capture them recording the songs and having fun, which they were. They were working very hard and there were no drugs or alcohol in the studio but still they were having a blast. They are fun guys, Rachel is still my brother to this day (laughs).

LRI: There is a world of difference in the material that was on the debut and the second album SLAVE TO THE GRIND. Do you remember any major differences in approach?

MW: No, not really it was just a natural progression, a little more aggressive for sure. It was also a little hard in the sense that if you sell ten million albums on your first album there is a LITTLE bit of pressure involved in the expectations of your second album. There was a little more stress the second time around due to the success of the debut but other than that we still had fun and did things pretty similar to the debut other than the fact that we did preproduction basically at Sebastian’s house. We started there as far as working out the material and all that, then we went to one studio and worked on demos before the actual final recording sessions.

LRI: You basically had a front row seat during SKID ROW’s rise and will always be associated with those guys. They are one of those bands who have had people clamoring for a reunion with Sebastian despite the fact that both the SKID ROW guys and Sebastian seem to be pretty adamant about not doing a reunion. Were they a pretty tight-knit unit during the time that you worked with them, was there any separation between them and Sebastian or were they pretty much a gang?

MW: I thought they were a very tight-knit band, they got along great and were always together absolutely. That band when they came out had the success they did based on the chemistry within the band and if you break that up it is never really the same and that’s the case with a few bands that come to mind including SKID ROW. It never really works right when you break up that original lineup, a lot of the band chemistry goes away except in the rare instances of a band like AC/DC which wasn’t really a break-up at all. When you start messing with the chemistry for a lot of these bands, especially with lead singers, it tends to be a problem for the fans who were so attached to that initial taste of the band.

LRI: You were involved in one of the heavier albums in WARRANT’s catalog when you produced DOG EAT DOG. Some have rumored that the sessions for that album were the first time the other WARRANT guys were truly involved in the studio and writing process. What were your experiences working with Jerry, Joey, Steven and Erik?

MW: It was great and I think that rumor is a myth and I think they were ALWAYS involved in every recording that band released. I had heard that too but I truly do not believe it because they are all really good players and perfectly capable of recording their own stuff. In any case, they were absolutely involved in every process of the DOG EAT DOG album and there was not ONE note from an outside musician or performer on that album, it was only the band. I can’t definitively speak on that because I didn’t make the first two albums but I cannot believe it because you can hear the musicianship of each individual member on their respective instruments on the album I did with them and in their live show. The thing that always stuck out to me about WARRANT is that they always were a heavy band, always it’s just that their record company and the powers that be never really fostered that or put it across. They were always much harder than what wound up on their albums and much deeper and we finally made the album they always WANTED to make which was very satisfying. Jani was always a tremendous writer and amazing singer but also very fortunate that band was always tight and always very hard rock.

LRI: The last band I wanted to ask you about was WHITE LION. That is another band that you are synonymous with along with SKID ROW. We spoke with Greg D’Angelo who, like all of your artists, had a very high opinion of your work and part in the band. What would it take to bring Vito Bratta and Mike Tramp back together again, is that something that you think could happen at some point?

MW: Well, that’s a great question but I don’t think anyone can answer it other than Vito himself (laughs). If he doesn’t wanna play guitar anymore that’s his thing I guess but in my mind he is one of THE best players I have ever had the pleasure of working with and I have worked with a few REALLY good guys (laughs). Vito is right up there with any of the greats but if he doesn’t wanna play I gotta respect that as his decision. I personally would LOVE to do another record with those guys and that lineup with Vito intact but if he doesn’t want to play anymore than it’s out of my hands and I can’t do anything about it and I don’t even wanna try (laughs).

LRI: Do you think that the major issues between the guys happened well after “PRIDE” or “BIG GAME”?

MW: Yes, they were very much a gang during the times I worked with them and very much on the same page. There is an international thing in that Mike is Danish and the other guys are New Yorkers which does cause some confusion sometimes but then I’m German so we got over that pretty quick and were able to work well together.
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